Thursday, June 18, 2020

To Kill A Mocking Bird: Book Review by Abhiram Singireddy

Plot: Atticus Finch's endeavors to demonstrate the innocence of Tom Robinson, a black man who has been wrongly accused of committing a crime by a white lady in 1930s Alabama.

This is a novel that I have read endless times over the years and it never fails to connect with me on some level with every reading. There are two primary reasons to read this book. The first reason is for the lovely depiction of creative childhood. The narrator, her brother Jem, and their companion Dill embody most of the characteristics of childhood, and their imaginative recreations and thought processes are a joy to view. The voice of Scout is a pitch-perfect recreation of childhood and childish motivations. Part I of this book is conceivably the most excellent recreation of childhood that I have come over in literature. Another reason may be a pretty simple one really. The character of Atticus Finch is one of the noblest literary creations ever composed. He is somebody who is respectable in each sense of the word and serves as a motivation for anybody. He is a great father, a conventional and compassionate man, and an individual who tries to see the good in almost anything.  It is apparent as you read this book that Harper Lee adores this character. Atticus’ emphatic want to see all people as humans and worthy of regard could be a lesson for our and all time. It could be a characteristic that numerous individuals preach, but few really practice. There are various other reasons why this is often a stellar work of genius, not slightest of which is the superb plotting of the novel, the great and fleshed out supporting characters and the message that Lee finds various ways to emphasize all through the book, which is picking on people who are helpless and don't do harm is a terrible thing. I would give this book a 9/10 and recommend it!

The Outsiders: Book Review by Abhiram Singireddy

Plot: It is 1965, and Tulsa, Oklahoma is isolated in two along social lines. The youths of each side shape groups in line with these two camps: the working course Greasers and the wealthier South Side gang, the Socs. The two sides utilize any opportunity to niggle each other and at whatever point they meet, there's contact. At that point, one night, a pack of Socs attack two Greasers, Johnny and Ponyboy, and Johnny murders one of the Socs with a knife. This sets off a chain of events.

I can unquestionably see why it has gotten to be one of the most enduring pieces of young adult fiction: while Ponyboy's circumstances and story may not specifically relate to many readers, the book deals with numerous relevant topics: the complexity of family and growing up, the scariness of the variety of paths you can take as a young adult, making troublesome choices and managing with the consequences, etc. The biggest thing that people complain almost is the "adolescent" writing style, and whereas certain minutes did feel bumping since how unexpected the transitions were, I thought that the direct, no-nonsense writing style increased the authenticity of the book--it truly feels like Ponyboy Curtis, the fourteen-year-old Greaser, is talking to us through the page. All of the characters are so compelling, and Hinton does a mind-blowing job uncovering the reality of the "Greasers" and allowing readers to stand up to the subtleties of all of her characters: Ponyboy's vision and heroism hosed by his circumstances, the dependability and brotherhood of the Greasers combined with their wrongdoing, the curbed potential of Darry, Dallas, and boys who are forced to grow up too quickly, the strife between the poor Greasers and the wealthy Socs, and the all-inclusiveness of their battles as high schoolers attempting to figure everything out.

Saturday, June 06, 2020

Mistborn: Book Review By: Keerthana Karthik

Mistborn, Brandon Sanderson’s first novel in a gripping, page turning trilogy, is a raging combination of masterful worldbuilding and suspenseful plot hatching that every fantasy reader seeks between two covers. In a world of oppression and darkness,  Sanderson introduces an  unlikely heroine through Vin, a shadow of a poor girl haunted by memories of cruelty and suspicion, and blooms her character by introducing it to that of Kelsier, an independent, recklessly powerful rebel leader. The two utilize the mysterious powers granted by life in this distorted society to undertake the tremendous task of bringing about the demise of a tyrannical ruler and the undoing of a social structure that caused them both nothing but pain. Through the association with Kelsier, Vin awakens dormant elements of her own personality and learns to form a harmonic balance with her own newfound power, discovered under the liberating instruction of Kelsier’s mentorship. Through a vicious struggle of classes for justice, of values for morality, and of self worth for self discovery, a mysterious underlying truth penetrates it all; and in the final, potent struggle for it’s discovery, Vin and Kelsier discover themselves in a way neither would have thought possible. As an avid fiction nerd, I truly enjoyed this book for a variety of reasons. For one, Sanderson’s vivid portrayal of a new and unfamiliar setting and his top rate worldbuilding related to it really places the reader in the heart of Luthadel, the city in which the story takes place. His descriptions bring the story to life around the book, and if you close your eyes, you will be able to envision the queer creatures and the dominating architechtural marvels mentioned. Beyond the worldbuilding element, however, is the gripping nature of the plot, and the perfect balance of enchantment and realism to keep the reader on the edge of their seat. To say that the course of events is unpredictable would be an understatement. The plot habitually familiarizes the reader with one concept, or idea, before completely twisting it in a way that makes no characterization certain, and  no prediction accurate.  Another thing that I respected about this book, though, was that it did not completely rely on the superpowers and magic system to drive the suspenseful plot; superpowers were outlined clearly as part and parcel of daily life through the hard nature of the magic system. They added to the reader’s interest because of the unfamiliarity of their concepts, and served to make the reading experience more enjoyable through the ingenuity of their portrayal. I would conclude by saying that Mistborn is a combination of all of these various, amazing elements and much, much more; but the true charm of this story cannot be revealed in anything but the book itself. That is why I strongly recommend Mistborn by Brandon Sanderson to anybody who is looking for a new read.

The Book Thief: Book Review by Abhiram Singireddy

Plot: The 550-page, World War II-era novel, described by Death, tells the story of Liesel Meminger from the time she is taken at age 9 to live with a foster family in a German working-class neighborhood. Liesel arrives having just stolen her first book, "The Gravediggers Handbook" --- I'll be the starting of a cherish undertaking with books.

I found the author's approach to the story to be quite poor. The primary and preeminent contrivance is that the story is described by Death. The choice of storyteller includes completely nothing to the story; it is as it were a diversion to the peruser, and it moreover energized the creator to include commonplace perceptions almost Death's viewpoint that include nothing to the story. On the off chance that Death had been given a created identity or a special viewpoint, at that point possibly the choice of the storyteller would have worked.  The other scheme I found most distracting is the repeated use of little newsflash-type, bold, and centered notes that appear periodically through the story to add dramatic effect. These newsflashes were irritating and served only to break up the natural narrative flow without adding anything significant. This is an example of the author hitting the reader over the head with his points, rather than trusting his own writing to get the message across. I think good Holocaust stories need to be told, but the Book Thief fails at that endeavor. The story is trite; the narrative is sentimental and uninspired.  I recommend that you look elsewhere for something better. There's plenty of other books out there that do a much better job such as Number the Stars by Lois Lowry. I would rate this book a 5/10, primarily because I could see what they were trying to make out of this book.

The Thief of Always: Book Review by Abhiram Singireddy

Plot. Harvey Swick may be a 10-year-old boy bored with school, teachers, homework, and his day-to-day life. In reaction to Harvey's disappointing plea for alter, a man named Rictus visits Harvey and tells him almost a kid's heaven called the Holiday House.

I liked the Thief of Always and I would give it a 9/10. It was exceptionally brisk and included a lot of action but still managed to allow enough background and information to keep you hooked and sometimes on edge. Proceeding on, the author uses plenty of sensory language and a good range of vocabulary. Also, it is additionally relatable. It has the message presented that you just want to get away for some time when everything around you may seem like a drag. In addition, Clive Barker does an extraordinary job of summing up everything and having a good and happy ending despite the fact that the plot is dark and bent. Lastly, the huge thing that Harvey learns is that joy won't appear up at your front door. The only way to make it happen is to create happiness yourself. For case, Harvey leaves his home in the hope of finding something better but at that point goes back and realizes his mistake, that he looked for joy rather than attempting to discover it at his own house. All in all, I like the Thief of Always and the biggest message that Harvey learned is that happiness must be made and not found.

The Giver: Book Review by Abhiram Singireddy

Plot: A story of a brilliant boy named Jonas who happens to live in a society that's being controlled by the rules and convention of The Elders. Through his shrewdness and quirk, Jonas is chosen as the Receiver of Memory, a post that recognizes him from others and gives him authority.

The Giver brought to the table a profound thoughtfulness that I don't usually see in the dystopian of today. The Giver keeps things simple when it comes to world-building, which would normally be a problem for me in any other book in the same genre, but here it works because it puts the focus on the important messages of the novel, rather than in the details of the world. This book is a fast read, not action-wise but in short, easy chapters that leave you needing to know more. This book quickly set me up with wondering many questions. And for each one that is answered right away, several new ones came up. The community is actually quite disturbing on many levels. Everything seems perfect, but in reality, it is far from that. There are rules and rules and rules. Words must be appropriately used. Speech is controlled, requested, confined. Like and observe, recollections of numerous things are confined and as it was held by one individual within the community, the Receiver. That's recollections of snow and daylight and war and famine. The character development and the clarifications in this book appeared destitute. Lowry could've gone into more depth with an explanation of Jonas' world and made the characters appear less dull. Be that as it may, I think the need for depth is fitting, given the reality that this book is typically read by middle schoolers. Finally, I would recommend this book to others and give it a 9 out of 10.

Saturday, May 23, 2020

Book Review of The Kingdom of Back by Marie Lu By Jenna (Library Assistant)


The Kingdom of Back by Marie Lu is a historical fantasy story spanning almost ten years which tells of young Maria Anna Mozart (nicknamed Nannerl) and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, two siblings who are musical child prodigies during the 18th century. Told through Nannerl’s point of view, she describes the adventures she and her younger brother have both in real life and the fantasy world they create out of boredom, the “Kingdom of Back.” The reader soon learn Nannerl's composing talents equal if not surpass her brother’s, but less attention is paid to her simply because she’s a girl. When she meets a handsome prince named Hyacinth, who climbs out of the Kingdom of Back, she realizes she has an opportunity to possibly attain her greatest wish: to be remembered. Hyacinth offers her a trade-she can have the recognition she desires in exchange for helping him regain his lost kingdom. Early on it seems to be an easy trade-off, but as she performs task after task for Hyacinth, she learns things aren’t always as they seem. How far will Nannerl go to get what she wants?

I was so excited to jump into this new fantasy book as I was really looking forward to escaping into a world very unlike our current quarantine state, but I had a hard time getting into it at first. Even with the maps on the inside covers, I had a hard time picturing the fantasy world, the Kingdom of Back, and I actually found myself more interested in the historical fiction side of Nannerl's adventures-meeting the future Marie Antoinette, traveling to different cities and countries to perform, and dealing with illnesses such as smallpox, than the escapes to the fantasy kingdom. After reading the Author’s Note at the end, I was surprised to find out how much of the story was based on real life. Wolfgang Mozart did have a sister who was also a composer/musician, though not much is known of her life. I loved how Lu’s story imagined who this person might have been, since women at the time had no hopes of being remembered for their work. At one point in the book, Nannerl says, "If I wanted immortality, it would not come from my writing. The words hung weighted around my neck. Composition was for men." Since we have little knowledge of what actually happened in Nannerl's life, I found myself really hoping that the small resistance moments Lu included might have been true. 

One of my favorite parts of the book was the relationship between the two siblings. Anyone with siblings can understand the immense love and closeness they shared, and also the inevitable anger, frustration, and guilt from both letting another down, and being let down yourself. Lu’s writing beautifully captured the polarizing feelings we can feel towards our family members at different times.   

While I was not furiously reading to find out what happened next, I found the last 1/3 of the book to be very engaging, so I am glad I stuck with it. After I was done, I had a feeling of wanting to go back and reread the beginning again with a fresh eye and perspective. I think there were parts on the fantasy side that could have been better developed, but overall I would recommend this to anyone looking for a good fantasy/historical fiction crossover, and especially those with an interest in playing or composing music.


Saturday, May 09, 2020

Scythe by Neal Shusterman Book Review by Abhiram Singireddy

Scythe by Neal Shusterman Book Review by Abhiram Singireddy

Plot: Scythe is a dystopian set in the future after humans have overcome death and aging. Those who are born in this age could live forever. The world is run by an AI, there is no government. The only ones above the view of the AI are scythes. Scythes are those that help trim the world population. If you are killed by a scythe, you will not be revived, you will pass away. It follows two teenagers who have entered the world of the scythes and must learn for themselves what it means to kill in an age where everyone lives forever.
I also liked the characters, more so the side cast than the leads, if I’m being honest. These character were Rowan and Citra. His storyline was so much more compelling and memorable because of his internal conflicts. He had doubts, misgivings, second thoughts, apprehension, fear, guilt pangs, and remorse. He is the all-knowing, fearless, brave hero who could do no wrong.
Citra on the other hand was almost the exact opposite of Rowan. She had a sense of justice but she was your everyday YA heroine - a sharp-witted, strong-minded impulsive heroine, which - kudos and all but in comparison to Rowan and his character growth, her storyline pales almost in all aspects. She didn’t go through half the hardships he did, thus, there was little growth there.

Another reason I like this novel is due to its recurring themes. I find it hard to see meaning/a purpose in some dystopian novels aside from an entertaining story, but Scythe was different. When you're forced to kill people as your job (or you're learning to kill people), your humanity becomes questionable. when you live in a world where there is no pain and your life is immortal, you see how detached we can become. Is that really a perfect world? It made me really think about what it means to be alive and what it means to be human.

Shusterman is masterful in his plot development, the unpredictable twists, and turns, and the questions it raises to readers. I would give this book a 10/10 and recommend it to other readers!

Extremely loud and incredibly close by Jonathan Safran Foer, review by Isha Patel

Extremely loud and incredibly close by
Jonathan Safran Foer

I just finished reading this book for my English class. This book is very different from any other book I ever read. It is concrete yet abstract at the same time. 

It is about a 9 year old boy named Oskar who lost his father during the 911 attack. Before he died he left a number of voice messages on Oskar's phone which Oskar never shares with anyone. One day while Oskar was trying to fathom the fact that his father is dead, he found an envelope with the word 'Black' on it inside a vase with a key in it on the highest self in his father's closet. Now, he was on a mission to go to every Black's house to find the lock that fits the key. This was his way to cope with his father's death without actually accepting his father's death. But later he realizes that the key and lock were not the central issue when he finds out the secret that his Grandma keeps from him for such a long time. Oskar has a habit of knowing different random concrete facts yet his ability to desperatly think about inventing anything that could have saved is father is very abstract. Oskar is quite a unique character who is both concrete and abstract in his thinking. 

I recommend this book because it sheds some vital light on how families felt losing their love ones in this attack. 

One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus Book Review By Ananya Singh

One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus Book Review 
By Ananya Singh

This award-winning book is written by American author Karen M. McManus. One of Us Is Lying spent 93 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. It also received a starred review from Publishers Weekly. According to McManus herself, it was somewhat inspired by the breakfast club but with a criminal twist. 
The book is about a group of 5 teenagers (Simon, Nate, Addy, Cooper, and Bronwyn) who were sent to detention as they were caught with their phones in their backpacks despite their school’s no phone policy. However, due to a series of events, only 4 students walk out of the classroom. The four students are suspects in the case and struggle to get out of this sticky situation. 
One thing I enjoyed was the characters. They all led different lives but were able to create strong friendships. They were also realistic and believable with flaws. They seem to be the type of people I would go to high school with. The plot was easy to follow, as well. That doesn’t mean that it was boring though. It was extremely interesting, suspenseful, and unpredictable. Overall, the plot included a unique mystery. 
The one thing I didn’t like about the book was that some sections were slow. They were unnecessarily long. Some details that I thought were going to come up later ended up not relating to the crime. They were not brought up again in the story. 
If you enjoy this book, definitely read the sequel titled One of Us Is Next. It follows the events of the previous book. It features a new set of characters and a new mystery. 

Friday, May 01, 2020

Lord of the Flies Book Review by Abhiram Singireddy

Lord of the Flies Book Review by Abhiram Singireddy

Plot: When a plane crashes on a desert island, the survivors who are only a group of British schoolboys try to work together and assemble on the beach in hope that they will be rescued. They create their own rules to survive until they get to know that there is a beast on the island.

I thought this story focused too much on human nature during an accident.  In this book, all the characters are children but still, those savage human actions and reactions are there. This is a classic and loved by many readers, but honestly, I did not enjoy it as much as I was expecting to. I can appreciate some of the things that Lord of The Flies offered and I can understand why writers like Stephen King and Patricia Cornwell rave about it. It's all about nostalgia.

At times unclear and messy with dialogue straight out of a poor straight-to-video movie. Possibly, my expectations were too high. A great idea for a story but the execution was badly done. I would give this book a 6 out of 10.

Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides review by Isha Patel

Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides

My English teacher recommended this book to me. I found it intersecting, got a hold of it and started reading it. It quickly become my new favorite book.

This book has 2 stories happening simultaneously and they meet in the end. The format in which this book is written is very unique. It is told with 2 intertwined timelines so the book jumps back and forth in time. You might be confused in the beginning as 2 stories are going on at the same time. But, once you read the ending the book makes complete sense because the ending connects the 2 stories together. The ending has such a twist to it that you will never have seen it coming. The author is very creative for coming up with such an impressive ending. It leaves the reader in awe stuck.

It is a story about an artist, Alicia, who kills her husband, Gabriel, and she never speaks again.
Alicia's past events triggered her to do this. As a result of her action she becomes mentality unstable and leaves in a asylum. A therapist, Theo, finds out about her and genuinely wants to help her. He thinks he can make her speak again. But it doesn't end the way he intended as she finds out who he actually is. The entire story is rooted in jealously, cheating, anxiety and self protection. All main character have malicious intentions which leads to their destructions.

I recommend this book to anyone who is into some mystery and crime and if you want to be a little of a detective and try to put the puzzle together. I enjoyed it because of it fast moving nature which kept me engaged. You definitely will not want to put the book down untill you have read it all the way through. Also if any of you have read The Wife Between Us then this is similar to it and if any of you have not read The Wife Between Us then I suggest reading that after you have given this one a go.

Harry Potter Series by J.K Rowling review by Isha Patel

Harry Potter Series by J.K Rowling

I finally got around reading this series and watching the movies. This series is so well written that I read all 7 books that had 4224 pages in total in literally 20 days so in about 3 weeks.

It's about three best friends, Harry, Ron and Hermione and their adventures from navigatating their schooling in Hogwarts to  fighting the Dark Lord. There is a prophecy which the Dark Lord has not heard fully. As a result he tries to kill Harry as a baby but first time in histroy the Dark Load fails to kill someone. Dark Lord wants to be immortal so he puts little pieces of his souls in various items. When his tried to kill Harry without fully hearing the prophecy, he is unsuccessful and part of his soul gets put into Harry. These Horcruxes that has Dark Lord's souls in them needs to be destroyed but Harry is one of the Horcruxes.

I recommend this book because it is a fantasy. It will take you to a whole different and new world. Even though the world of magic and muggles is not real, you will really wish it was. J.K Rowling brings the world of witches and wizards to life in her books. Everything that non magic people have, the magic people also have but in their own unique way. I also recommend listening to audiobooks of this series because it will give you the full experience of British accent as well. 

After reading or listening to these books, you can ignite your little creative side and write fan fictions about specific events in the books that you are very passionate about how it should have been. You can analyze characters that have many layers like Snape or Dumbledore and even analyze how this book is central around love. You can watch or make videos about fan theories or rating the 7 books in the series from least to most favorite. Maybe in the future, you can even visit the Wizarding World near you and I highly recommend this one.


Friday, April 24, 2020

Dry by Neal Shusterman Book Review by Abhiram Singireddy

Dry by Neal Shusterman Book Review

Dry by Neal Shusterman is a youth novel in the category of science fiction. The novel starts quite promisingly: in the drought zone of California, water suddenly no longer comes from the taps and what happens next is unknown.  The protagonists are teenage Alyssa, her young brother Garrett, a neighbor's nerd boy Kelton and a girl called Jacqui. The book is told in chapters, which are fragments of events told from each person’s perspective.

As people begin to realize that there is no more water, chaos and greed begin to raise their heads. Alyssa and Garrett’s parents set out by the sea to look for a water purification point so they can get water for the family. Kelton’s father has equipped his home to hold off disasters. He’s not very compassionate to the people in his neighborhood and it eventually backfires, as everyone looks to obtain water through him. There are be several bends in the journey and as time goes on because there is no water.

The novel is quick-paced, dramatic, and intriguing. It is a good read and I would easily recommend this book to others!

One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus Book Review By Ananya Singh

One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus Book Review 
By Ananya Singh 

This award-winning book is written by American author Karen M. McManus. One of Us Is Lying spent 93 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. It also received a starred review from Publishers Weekly. According to McManus herself, it was somewhat inspired by the breakfast club but with a criminal twist. 
The book is about a group of 5 teenagers (Simon, Nate, Addy, Cooper, and Bronwyn) who were sent to detention as they were caught with their phones in their backpacks despite their school’s no phone policy. However, due to a series of events, only 4 students walk out of the classroom. The four students are suspects in the case and struggle to get out of this sticky situation. 
One thing I enjoyed was the characters. They all led different lives but were able to create strong friendships. They were also realistic and believable with flaws. They seem to be the type of people I would go to high school with. The plot was easy to follow, as well. That doesn’t mean that it was boring though. It was extremely interesting, suspenseful, and unpredictable. Overall, the plot included a unique mystery. 
The one thing I didn’t like about the book was that some sections were slow. They were unnecessarily long. Some details that I thought were going to come up later ended up not relating to the crime. They were not brought up again in the story. 
If you enjoy this book, definitely read the sequel titled One of Us Is Next. It follows the events of the previous book. It features a new set of characters and a new mystery. 

Thursday, April 02, 2020

Book Review of All the Days Past, All the Days to Come by Mildred D. Taylor By Jenna (Library Assistant)


As a young girl, I vividly remember reading Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry as it was the first time I was presented with the many harsh realities that young black children had to endure growing up in the Deep South during the Great Depression. I remember meeting Cassie, a feisty nine-year-old, whose commitment to her family and her principles despite deep prejudice and hardships impressed me. Her experience was so unlike mine and reading this book was eye-opening for me as I quickly learned of the horrible racism that she experienced at the hands of people who look like me.  That feeling and memory has always stayed with me. When I heard Mildred D. Taylor had written another book, All the Days Past, All the Days to Come, about this same influential character all grown up, I knew I wanted to read it and see how Cassie “turned out.” All the Days Past, All the Days to Come shows some things never change when it comes to the persevering human spirit and love of family.

Overall, I enjoyed the story of Cassie’s young adult years (the story spans from 1944-1963). We follow her journey as she tries to find her own career path, experiences romantic love and loss, struggles to take care of her family while still trying to find a life of her own, and determines how far she is willing to go to improve race relations in the deeply segregated South. We meet plenty of characters along the way who try to push her in one direction or another, but I liked how she was ultimately always true to herself.

I enjoyed the storytelling in first person narrative-one could almost imagine Cassie telling these stories to her grandkids one day. Though at times, I think it was a bit long winded and lacked great action. To me, it seemed like sometimes during scenes when I expected great tension, the reader was left hanging and instead we received Cassie’s reaction to the event rather than a description of the event itself. There was a bit too much telling, instead of showing for me. Furthermore, it was very thorough and I think at almost 500 pages, it could have been trimmed down a bit to the more prevalent experiences she had. Still, I did want to continue reading to find out what would happen next for her.

For me, some of the more interesting parts were towards the end when we learn about her experience and participation in Mississippi during the Civil Rights movement, ending up at events with Medgar Evers and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. I would recommend this book to fans of historical fiction and especially anyone looking to get a more personal understanding of this time period. While I have seen documentaries, listened to speakers, and read articles about this period, reading this book definitely made it more real. On several occasions, Cassie said, “Being colored was a way of life in America, and it was a full-time job.” Reading this book, one could definitely understand the great fear, stress, and violence she, her family, and neighbors had to endure simply for how they looked. Overall, it is not a quick or light read, but an important story to hear and a worthwhile read.   

Book review by Isha Patel of The Diary Of A Young Girl by Anne Frank

Book review of The Diary Of A Young Girl by Anne Frank

This is the most read book about the Holocaust. I recommend this book to any and everyone who wants to pay tribute to the lives lost in the Holocaust. 

This book is actually a diary written by young teenage girl. Her family with few other people went into hiding for 2 years in Netherlands due to the Nazis. This shows her life in hiding as well as her growing up as a teenager including being stubborn, fighting with parents, boyfriend problems and maturing into a women.

The fact that Anne Frank died few weeks before camps were liberated was so tragic and devastating. Her identity is a single representative for the million of who suffered and died just like she did. Her suffering and tragedy are so real and are shown in the way she writes.

It had also being made into play which I think is cool and I recommend watching it as it will feel like you are living in the moment with them and feel the real fear that Anna Frank and all the other people felt of getting busted or betrayed any second.

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn Book Review By Ananya Singh

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn Book Review
By Ananya Singh

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn is an incredibly suspenseful novel. It revolves around the lives of Nick Dunne and Amy Dunne. Nick Dunne, a New York-based writer, and Amy Dunne are struggling with their marriage. Despite this, they present themselves as a cheerful couple. On their marriage anniversary, Amy, who is pregnant, goes missing and Nick is the first suspect in the case.
I appreciate that the novel is from Amy and Nick’s point of view. We get to see how these characters view each other despite presenting a happy, healthy marriage to the public. In addition, the novel is written in a realistic manner in terms of the investigation process. As readers, we are accustomed to knowing everything the characters in the novel know. However, this book is different. The reader soon realizes that Nick and Amy Dunne are quite unreliable. They leave out details and lie to trap one another. In reality, investigators don’t know the entire truth. It takes a great deal of digging on their part to find out what truly happened in such cases. In fact, it allows the reader to act like an investigator and figure out what happened as they read. Moving on, I have no complaints. I thoroughly enjoyed the book. 
Flynn was inspired to write this novel because of Laci Peterson. She was an American woman who went missing while 8 months pregnant. Her husband at the time, Scott Peterson, is currently on death row as he was convicted for the murder of Laci and their unborn son in 2003. Check it out if you're craving for another mystery!

To Kill A Mocking Bird: Book Review by Abhiram Singireddy

Plot: Atticus Finch's endeavors to demonstrate the innocence of Tom Robinson, a black man who has been wrongly accused of committing a c...