Thursday, August 18, 2011


My book review (from the Garden State Teen Book Awards Phamplet) for The Summer I Turned Pretty:
Every summer since before she was born, Belly's spent time at the beach with her family and her mom's best friend's family. This summer will be different, Belly can feel it. She's turning sixteen and she's determined to prove that she's not a kid anymore. But Belly's caught between the past and the present; clinging on and letting go; Jeremiah and Conrad. This summer is her turning point towards womanhood and she can just feel it. This is not a regular book full of fluff, but a spectacular read. Please read this book to find out how her summer turns out and how she will feel about it.

~Deblina Mukherjee~



My book review (from the Garden State Teen Book Awards Phamplet) for The Devils Paintbox:  
 
When orphans Aiden and Maddy Lynch first meet trailrider Jefferson J. Jackson in the spring of 1865, they’re struggling to survive on their family’s drought-ravaged Kansas farm. So when Jackson offers an escape they naturally take it. This book is about their journey to this place that is supposedly the end of all their troubles. The book's plot was not very interesting and was expected. The language in the first pages were atrocious, but overall, the book was OK and selective readers might like this book :)
 
~Deblina Mukherjee~

My book review (from the Garden State Teen Book Awards Phamplet) for Tofu Quilt
 
Yeung Ying leaves Hong Kong to spend the summer with her Uncle Five and his children in mainland China. When she recites classical Chinese poems for him, he rewards her with a special treat. The poems in this book reveal her struggles to be a writer in a sexist 1960's China... The thing is that I have read lots of books with this theme (except the settings have been different)... The book would have been more enjoyable if there was a twist or something unique about it :)
 
~Deblina Mukherjee~

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