Thursday, September 22, 2011


Three Rivers Rising is a fictional look at the Jamestown Flood in the 1800s. Its in poetry form (which makes for a fun quick read) and alternates to several different characters viewpoints. The main story is a forbidden romance between Celestia (upper-class, wealthy) and Peter (working-class). They meet because Peter works at the summer hotel they are staying in. Their story is juxtaposed with several townspeople and their general lives. Then the flood comes and lives are changed forever. I really enjoyed the nod towards history but completely made up people, and now I want to read some history books and learn more. Check this out, especially if you have to read historical fiction, because as a poetry book, it goes fast!





This is another historical poetry style fiction novel, set in the 60's with a family that bears a striking resemblance to the Manson family. Ostow puts us in the head of one of the girls. She explains how she became part of the family, why she stays and most of all, why she participates in the evil things she is told to do. This is a frightening look into how and why a cult functions.









Shut Out has an intriguing premise. When the soccer and football teams don't get along, the girls decide they've had enough. Their solution......no cuddling, no sex, nothing until they declare a truce. Keplinger essentially has done a modern version of Aristophanes' play Lysistrata, and she even references it several times in the book. I'm not sure this is the strongest book I've ever read, but it was definitely fun....a literary equivalent of eating a bag of chips.....and I will definitely recommend this to fan's of Dessen and other romantic novels. (plus now I am very interested in reading Lysistrata, so hey, call it a gateway book...lol)







I deeply adore James Howe's books The Misfits and Totally Joe. I understand James wanting to go back and flesh out Addie a bit more, but honestly, I wish he had gone and quickly gone over stuff we've already read and then go somewhere new. Instead we have Addie's story in poetry format going over events we've already seen. I suppose it's only because I adored the other books SO much that I am disappointed in this, because I didn't feel like there was anything new.....and I did like Addie, so it would have been nice to see or find new things or have new situations for them to address as characters. Nonetheless, I will always love James Howe and will never hesitate to recommend his books =)

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Hey Saleena -
It's Diane at the IS Desk. Did you know that this book Shut Out, by Kody Keplinger has my niece on the cover? Her name is Alison Burnett, and she lives in South Brunswick, she attended South Brunswick High School, and is now going to Middlesex County College. She's 19, and her brother is a sophomore at the high school right now.

Just thought it was fun to see her book cover in your blog!

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